About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CSPAN 18
CSPAN2 17
CNN 4
CNNW 4
WETA 2
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 46
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)
in that environment, it has been hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids. the rest of our government, which is essentially on life- support. that is hard to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department is that you need to get back -- get by on cunning and strategy. you do not have the resources the other branches of the government has. the hope that there will be balanced in the account period ahead, the new budget includes the state department as part of the national security as a whole. i would not hold my breath. i think it will be hard making the case robusta diplomacy. my hope is that it will be a bipartisan effort. it will be challenged not matter much. my primary -- it will be challenged no matter what. we need something that will allow our forces to do several things. first, we need a robust change of views on strategy and our overall approach is. the kind of thing that chris laid out on talking abou
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it a-- it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the
to be resources going forward. secretary clinton had an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's hard to convince others that they need to sustain the necessary levels of funding for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or collection of institutions basically on steroids, military and national security and the rest of our government, essentially in my support. that is a very hard team to sustain. one of the things i like about the state department, but one of the things that the challenge as he got to get by and cunning and guile and strategy. if you don't have the programs come you don't have the resources at their riches of the government have. the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole. but i wouldn't hold my breath. you think it's going to be hard and making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope would be a bipartisan affair, but it's going to be a challenge to matter what. secondly unmelted now,, my primary inter
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
at just the work environment where do you look at the home environment. a lot of habits that you have a development for home, you want people to practice safe computing wherever they are. whether or not it is their device from your device, or whatever kind of device. so i think that to sympathize with the public to the challenges and in a way that we did keep america beautiful, keep america safe, i think that we really need to do that. the second point -- i have three of them. the second point is that the sky is falling ocean is just hurting us. because people say yeah, right. but i think that we need to not communicate the sky is falling in the sky is just not going to fall. a lot of people compare now to what we did and there was a certain amount of sky is falling with y2k. the sky didn't fall. nothing fell out the sky. yet we felt we spent a lot of time and resources. last one i want to make is that it is difficult to share information when we have two political fortunes to classify. it is something that i need to know or communicate. i can't communicate what you guys right now. bu
in a crisis environment that they will not necessarily accept when it is going well. ecowas your point that no one has been yelling fire -- that goes to your point that no one has been yelling fire. is an impetus to get things done. i am co-chairman of the campaign to fix the debt. i do not know how many of you or your cdo's were present when my cochair and i spoke to the roundtable in washington. bob zelnick is a member of our board. he said, the u.s. is one debt deal away from semenya its place as the world of leading economic power for the next -- from cementing its place as the world, leading economic power for the next 25 years. and he is right to i think we can do it. i think senator toomey has been a leader on this issue. if he were convinced, and convincing him is never easy, but if he were convinced, he would get things done. it may not be 100% of what what what, -- if i could play one thing in the senate cloakrooms, it would be the rolling stones song "you can't always get what you want." >> it is fairly easy at one level because you have budget involved. you can say that the
think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> just going to keep on keeping on, until every single person out there who needs to vote is going to go vote. >> this week on "inside washington," the endgame. the last debate. >> nothing governor romney just said is true. attacking >> me is not talking about how we deal with the challenges in the middle east. >> the women's vote and the return of the abortion debate. >> i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape that it is something that god intended to happen. >> the colin powell endorsement. >> i was proud to learn that we have colin powell's support in this campaign. >> you have to wonder if that is based on issues or whether he has a slightly reason for preferring president obama -- a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we are all most of their pit believe it or not, at the election is now less than two weeks away and both candidates are running as if there is no to
themselves quite well in the debates. but the point is, they're in this larger environment, what is going to go on. i worry we're going to see muddling through instead of clear-cut tax reform, infrastructure program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's --
declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of the war and yet we realized that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and death of the vulnerabilities. and so, what we are trying to do in the series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad and congress and people around the country can understand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either embrace the kind of approach commerce one wilson has embraced. she signed the pledge to support the cut cabin balance program. that's a tea party approach to balancing the budget and it has no new revenues even for the wealthiest americans. and it is so draconian that would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time or we can member is a balanced approach. that's what i support and i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration and those upper income e
environment. when jack markell ran he put together a blueprint for delaware. we have not done a good enough job of creating that environment. >> let us go to the follow up. we stand on the blueprint for delaware? >> we still of war to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to agree to dollar version. we have not been able to add as much as we would like. mr. gregg can say hispanic, but it is not spin. it is not spin to the people -- jeff craig can say is sprin. in. these are real jobs, real family is being put back to work. >> feel free to offer your opinion. >> it is then 30,000 unemployed from 18,000 additional who have dropped out of the workforce, people of taken part-time jobs, we can argue, but on election day those people will go to the polls and make a decision. >> of cited the high percentage of people in delaware and a part of their paychecks from the government. if you are to trim down the government are produced exasperatingly problem? >> i moved to delaware in the late 1980's. today the largest employer is the state of delaware, the second largest is th
women's healthcare, not a single one of those votes talked about the environment, not a single vote talked about transportation infrastructure, not a single vote were dealing on education or a single one on gun control. all things that i think are important to people in the 10th district and are critical votes. my opponent doesn't want to talk about it. >> if we look at the record this congress, which is the most uneffective congress we've had, you voted twice on the ryan plan that turns medicare. a voucher plan. he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment. over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted on them on issue after issue. >> congressman dold, your vote on obamacare, why you vote against it? >> you look at the affordable care act. there are things in there that are positive. >> how come? >> because i think we want to call it by its name. long end short, we got 21 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on new set ten years doubled. this is going to be enormously troubling. >> it didn't double. >> it did. you're talking about a t
environment. >> you agree with me that it is easier, more fun, and potentially more successful to play the game of sport as opposed to this serious business of -- >> i'm not robbing a bank because that's where the money is, but i agree that drives it, as well. but i don't let the candidates off the hook. i think -- you know, when we start beating up ourselves in the media, we deserve our blame. but we've got campaigns that have no substance to talk about. i mean, and one what are their -- do they get on twitter, goat youtube with the ads? they spin us about polls. you ask the romney people to explain how they're going to pay for their tax cut. you don't get an answer. you want a jobs plan from obama, you don't get an answer. >> on that point of what the campaigns themselves are serving up, and of course we tend to cover what they are talking about, obama campaign ad has gotten a whole lot of attention the last couple of days. lina dunham, creator and star of hor's "girls," saying this about why she is swooning for the president. >> the first time shouldn't be with just anybody. you wan
people think is the changing media environment. you mentioned we have not had prosecutions of reporters are media organizations, but i am wondering if your thoughts, and the challenges posed by the changing media landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints t
. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of war, and get we realize that maybe one in 1000 people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. so what we are trying to do with the zero day series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and the platonic idea is that everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand, and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace. >> if you look at cyberspace in the united states right now, how would you describe security overall? much as we would describe crime or break-ins in a neighborhood. >> in the spirit of the explanatory mission, you cannot really talk about cyberspace and the united states. a computer user in washington, d.c., or in wichita, or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or moscow. there is literally milliseconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. i thought i would point that out. as for the security, t
>> the environment of people and machines and networks as new domain of war, and yet we realize that maybe one in a thousand people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and the depth of the vulnerabilities. and so what we're trying to do in the zero days series is to take pieces of itand elain theundamentals and the platonic ia is that everybody from my mom and dad t congress, um, and peop around the country can undstand and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways for us to defend cyberspace better. >> hos wel if look at cyberace the united states rinow, how wouldou debe surityverall? much as we would deribe, maybe, crime or break-ins in a neighborhood? >> guest: well in the spirit of the explanatory mission we have, you can't really talk about cyberspace in the united states. a computer user in washington, d.c. or in wichita or san francisco is effectively working shoulder to shoulder with a computer user in beijing or in moscow. there's literally no seconds of difference in space and time in cyberspace. so i thought i'd point that out. as for the sec
of those volts tenny hoyer voted for. not a single one talked about women's health care, the environment, not a single one was talking about transportation infrastructure, not a single one of those votes were dealing on education or a single one on gun control, all things that i think are important to the people of the 10th district and i think are critical votes -- [inaudible conversations] schneider. if we look at the record of this congress which is the most ineffective in our lifetimes, he voted twice with the ryan plan. he talks -- he voted with this congress over 200 times against our environment, over 28 times against obamacare. he's voted with them on issue after issue, on every core issue -- >> moderator: okay. you raised an important one. congressman dold, your votes on obamacare. you voted against it. why? dold: if we look at the affordable care act, i think we can agree there are some things -- >> moderator: by the way, you call it the affordable care act as opposed to obamacare. dold: i think we got 23 new taxes on this. the estimates in terms of the cost estimates on the ne
back. personal income tax and we need to create a stable business environment. we have not done a good enough job creating that environment and that is borne out by the numbers. >> where do you stand on your blueprint for delaware? >> we have implemented the majority of items in their and we have more to go. some of them we did not have the resources. i said we ought to create a delaware version of a cops bill. we have made progress there as well. it is not spin to the hundreds of workers were back at the refinery. it is not spin to the people who decided to expand in delaware. it is not spin to the folks at foxfire printing who are adding dozens of jobs. it is not spin to the people at jpmorgan chase. these are real jobs, real families being put back to work. >> fill free to offer your opinion. >> 18,000 additional individuals who have dropped out of the work force, people who have taken part-time jobs, we can argue back and forth about the numbers but those people go to the polls and i will make a decision based on their own personal experience. >> >> you cited the number of people w
in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a work force but can move back and forth easily. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural industry, they can i get back and forth like a one-two. the rangers are telling us every day, we desperately need
that kind of individualized attention may be harder to get now in the environment that states are moving to. states really there in the degree to which the shift to automated method is being pushed versus just being offered as an additional opportunity for accessing the program. and so i think it's important to remember that not all low income population of access to the technology, to the internet or the same ability to be able to use it. we hear about prepaid cell phone plans being a problem for people when have to wait on hold for a long time or participate in an interview over the telephone. many states are closing local offices, which would mean that people live in remote areas have to drive farther if they do want to be able to see somebody and talk to things within. and are increased, or still have reports of uncommon benefits, lost paperwork, long wait times in person and on the telephone. and auto closure, which is sort of the way fancy way of saying that the state had the cheerios for people but didn't have the time to act on it so the computer automatically will close cases. and
. that could not be more out of touch. a big part of this district is the environment, and so much of our economy is based on our environment. there is a direct correlation, whether it is tour is a more realistic. >> presidential candidate michele bachmann came down here and floated that idea and i was all over her on a -- like a black eye on a pea. when you look at what has happened with planned parenthood, perhaps you should call kathleen sebelius, to whom the agency came out with saint planned parenthood is not doing mammograms. >> both of you have spent a lot of money. it is among the costliest congressional races in the country to support legislation that would limit the influence of outside groups, and is that necessary? >> that needs to be argued in front of the supreme court. the supreme court already made that decision. if you look at our record, we have an incredible amount, almost 95% from individual donors. i cannot help but that people want to donate. if outside groups, some have placed $5 million in attacks against me. so be it at my opponent's father created pack specifical
no matter what. we have created an environment that is toxic for businesses. we have radical deficit spending. we have a federal government out of control with the amount of red tape and things that they are imposing on businesses. we wonder why then we do not have any jobs and why that jobs are being sent overseas. talk is fine, but the fact of the matter is, the unemployment and the deficit and the whole situation with the economy speaks for itself. it is now working. big government is not the solution. >> thank you, congressman. our next question is a senior co editor for the globe news magazine. please ask your question. >> congressman akin, would you speak of your commitment to improving public school education in missouri? especially given the educational choices you have made for your own children. i am referring to your decision to home school your children and senator mccaskill's to send at least one of her children to private catholic schools. >> thank you for that question. all of us understand that education is critical. one of the things we have in america is something c
to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] try new alka-seltzer plus severe allergy to treat allergy symptoms, plus sinus congestion, and pain. home of the legendary grand prix circuit. the p
that come through their counties that have burst, spilling 50,000 barrels of oil into their environment. that is what happens when you bypass rules. we cannot let these large powerful interests create their own will. the lobbying firm in washington d.c. that represented the folks -- behalf have a diversified portfolio. -- we have to have a diversified portfolio. >> the company would have many jobs in wisconsin. she voted for the epa against the paper companies of wisconsin. i find it hard to believe that any congressman in from wisconsin would do that. she did. let me move to a different topic. >> jobs. we are that the heart of milwaukee. people are struggling. there are people in farms and rural areas that are struggling. what is the proper role of government in terms of trying to deal with this problem of long- term unemployment? or is it not really governments role? >> let's look at the history of this community. it used to be a big industrial manufacturing center of the state. closey of the company's or go overseas. so that is partly why did they focus on making things again in amer
view anything dealing with the environment as potentially damaging jobs. and romney had to pass a litmus test during the primaries, which, was in effect 'climate change is a hoax. don't trust the scientists. >> another largely ignored fact of life in 2012, a series of mass shootings. 2 killed and 9 wounded outside the empire state building. 7 killed at a university in oakland, california. 7 dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wounded at a movie theatre in aurora, colorado. and then there was this -- >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> liberty and justice for all. >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theaters don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on gun
in a highly politicized and highly charged political environment, we simply, as the white house, and as the state department has collected information, they have gotten its to the american public. host: democrat from florida. go ahead? all right, we're going to move on to barbara. angie, are you with us? you are on the air. caller: when americans wake up on november 7th, they have been made the right choice of president obama. -- corporations running their country, they will regret their choice for ever. everything the president has done -- doing it -- he inherited bankruptcy of the whole country. -- shipped off the jobs to foreign countries. i lived through that. i have been a refugee almost all of my life. guest: a couple of the important points that you bring up -- one of them is that, i do believe that voters in florida and the voters in iowa, and voters across the country understand the depth of what this president and his team faced when it came in. today is the anniversary of the great crash in 1929. the dow did not come back to its pre-1929 levels until 1954. that is wha
was hoping we could talk a little bit about changing media environment. you mentioned that we haven't had a prosecution of reporter or media organization. but i'm wondering if you're faults are any challenges posed by the landscape, the emergency of the new organizations and technologies that might be as responsible and willing to listen to government requests. are we looking at the new era because of the kind of fragmentation of the media environment and what kind of challenges might there be for the classification regime and prosecutors going forward? >> you mean is aera journalist? >> it complicates the issue let's put it that way. it's not of "the new york times" >> neil? >> they're worried about the article on the front page of the post that has was that information you were thinking about now. all of new types of journalists or media operate under the constraints of the traditional media do. i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others when the of clauson for the information they think they have that information to the government and say look, you make the case for
environment. >> thank you. chris, so you start running drugs for a man named jeff andrews. can you describe for us the worst experience when you're heading up to wichita, right? >> yes, i never did drugs, so i don't understand the drug culture per se, but i'll never forget the first drug load iran was over 100 pounds. and we negotiated the price. i get in the car and start driving and all i can think was man, what happens if my car breaks down? what happens if i get a flat tire? what happens if they get in a wreck? i was out over the fact drugs or in my car. at that point, delusions and paranoia starts speaking in nbc's ghost behind every tree in cops behind every bush. i really thought i was going insane in that moment. >> she had a particularly ingenious disguise i thought. >> well, there's a ski mountain south of el paso sectors and skis in the car at the ski report. when i hit the border patrol check point, the border agent, they'd never question me before. when i was running drugs have as much younger and of course much better looking because i had hair. [laughter] so you would've neve
into cybersecurity and cyber warfare, the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and the networks as a new domain of war and yet we realized that maybe 1 in one dows and people really understood what cyberspace was and the degree and depth of the vulnerabilities. so what we are trying to do it in the zero days a series is take pieces of it and explain the fundamentals and a platonic idea is everybody from my mom and dad to congress and people around the country can understand, and so maybe start the process of coming up with ways to defend cyberspace better. >> cyberspace vulnerabilities, tonight at 8:00 eastern on the communicators, on c-span2. >> we have a pretty simple proposition. you can either increase the kind of approach that congresswoman wilson has embraced. she signed a pledge to support the cut, cap, and balance program. that is a tea party approach to balancing the budget. it has no new revenues, even for the wealthiest americans. it is so draconian that it would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time. or we can embrace a balanced
for my issues which are limited government and lower taxes and less regulatory environment. i think in colorado where you find is you move west across the united states. the republican voter is a closet-libertarian type loder where it is limited government. it is an old west at age, keep government out of our lives. you see democratic voters as evident by our governor who moved more toward the center. if they could have another moniker it would be the common sense party. limited government and less washington, d.c. involvement. >> the governor is a democrat. what is the makeup of the state legislature? guest: we have a slight majority in the statehouse so we control the state house. in the state senate you have a slim majority. our attorney general and secretary of state and state treasurer are three other statewide elected officials. the governor, democrat who is very popular is obviously a democrat. it is representative of the voting population which we are helter-skelter and we have democrats and republicans controlling all sorts of key offices. caller: i have two questions. gove
, but we are not operating in a vacuum. we are operating in an economic environment where we have $16 billion debt in washington. families are struggling. we need money here for the american people here. i will stop giving our tax dollars to support terrorists. i support what joe manchin supports regarding responsible exploration for oil and gas. senator brown is try to block exploration of oil and gas and ohio. he does not support our coal mining families in eastern ohio. i will work to keep these energy jobs in ohio. i believe in ohio, energy equals jobs. >> most of what josh said wasn't true, about where we spend money, and energy exploration. let me answer it this way. i told you about the roundtables. a farmer told me we can save billions of dollars taking away the farm subsidies with a better safety net. i went to senator thune from south dakota. he got it amended into the farm bill and it passed in july. it can be the china currency bill. i teamed up with kay bailey hutchinson -- i can list 10 or 15 things that were good, bipartisan efforts that are making a difference. >> trea
environment it's also very difficult to see or to guarantee that various rebel groups will not turn their arms on each other. unfortunately, the situation in syria has already deteriorated to such a point that even if assad were to magically disappear tomorrow, that would not spell the end of the conflict or the problems in syria. there are significant issues now at play. significant sectarian tensions as well as ethnic tensions between kurds and arabs and so forth. the third argument is that if the u.s. arms or helps to arm these opponents, it will translate into greater u.s. influence over those who eventually run syria. again, history proves that that is not the case. so i, so let me, let me, with that, with my two minutes that i've now been told i have left, let me move and try to end on a positive note which is, essentially, my own sense is that the downside risks of a military option in syria are significant. i also think the fact that we have reached the point we have reached with the conflict which is to say such a significant escalation of horrific violence inside the country as well
in creating the overall environment, the actual act is pretty quickly attributed directly on the insurgents. >> general -- >> thank you. just a final remark by me on this issue. protecting the civilian population is an absolute principle of this operation. without that protection this operation, in my view, would not be viable. and i think that is the view of all my counterparts and afghans as well. >> [inaudible] >> general and dame mary, the north atlantic council decides the rules of engagement. does the north atlantic council direct that in those rules of engagement if there was a possibility of a civilian casualty, that engagement should not take place, or is it a judgment call given down to the respective commander at the level that it's required to be made? in other words, if there's a possibility of a is civilian being hurt -- of a civilian being hurt by, say, a drone strike, it doesn't go ahead, or is it a judgment call made at another level? >> no. >> we are not allowed to give details on rules of engagement. >> indeed, i won't. but what i can say, the political guidance always gi
going forward. secretary clinton's been an absolute heavyweight, but even in that environment it's opinion hard to convince others of the need to sustain necessary levels of funding fur diplomacy -- for diplomacy. what we really have is a government with one institution or a collection of institutions that are basically on steroids, our military and national security, and the rest of our government which is, essentially, on life support. and that's a very hard thing to sustain. and so one of the things i like about the state department but one of the things that's a challenge is that you've got to get by on cunning and gilens and strategy. because you don't have the programs, you don't have the resources that the other branches of the government has. so the hope is there's going to be more balance in the period ahead. the new budgeting apparatus includes the state department as part of the national security budget as a whole with. but i wouldn't hold my breath. i think making the case for robust diplomacy, my hope will be a bipartisan effort, but it's going to be a challenge no m
in the -- the structure and the -- the environment in the middle east. with the arab spring came a great deal of hope that there would be a change towards more moderation and opportunity for greater participation on the part of women and -- and public life and in economic life in the middle east. but instead we've seen in nation after nation a number of disturbing events. of course, we see in syria 30,000 civilians having been killed by the military there. we see in -- in libya an attack apparently by -- well, i think we know now by terrorists of some kind against -- against our people there, four people dead. our hearts and minds go to them. mali has been taken over, the northern part of mali, by al- qaeda-type individuals. we have in -- in egypt a muslim brotherhood president. and so what we're seeing is a -- a pretty dramatic reversal in the kind of hopes we had for that region. of course, the greatest threat of all is iran, four years closer to a nuclear weapon. and -- and we're going to have to recognize that we have to do as the president has done. i congratulate him on -- on taking out osama b
productive, less tense environment in the region. then you take israel even to compare it to taiwan, that issue was bracketed between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over the us rail and palestinian issue. but i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with iran just like china. when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of over three million chinese. they didn't just have a nuclear weapons program, they had tested nuclear weapons. the interest here is what is in the u.s. national interest. even there this is another critical challenge for the united states. as middle eastern populations become more empowered and have more of a say in each of their countries, they are not going to vote for, they are not going to support a secular, democratic u.s. model for their governance. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept or lobby for a complete copy of the islamic republic
tense, less mill tar is particular environment in the region. then if you compare it to even taiwan, that issue was brabblingted between the two countries, between china and the united states. it was bracketed. you could similarly have something between the united states and iran over israel and the palestinian issue that is bracketed. i must come back to this other issue. this is in our strategic interest to come to terms with the islamic republic of iran, just like china. keep in mind, when mao was in charge, when nixon went to see mao, he had just presided over the killing of three million chinese. they didn't have a nuclear energy program, they tested nuclear weapons. the issue here is, what is in the u.s. national interest, not whether we think iranian government officials are good or bad, but even there, this is another critical challenge for the united states. as minor populations become more empowered in each of their countries they are not going vote for or support a secular democratic u.s. model for their government. they're not going to do it. they're not going to accept
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)